Where Are Your Gods Now?


Earlier last year, HBO seemed confident that their long gestating American Gods series would see some signs of life by the end of 2013. I even took the opportunity to make some casting suggestions (all of which I stand behind). Turns out for HBO, not so much. Quietly, and late in the year, they allowed their option on the series to expire. Why? Says Neil Gaiman:
"I wrote this first draft script that I loved. One of the reasons I loved it was because I go to do all this new stuff that wasn’t in the book. I got to open it up. Look, the book begins with Shadow in prison, about to get out of prison, so I opened the [pilot episode so] you got to see the bank robbery that went wrong, you got to see all the things that wound up with him in prison you got to see his entire three-year stretch in prison… you’re half an hour into this thing before he’s getting out of prison – stuff like that – and it was definitely the sort of awkward, embarrassed notes from HBO where they’re going ‘Um, can you make it more like the book?’"
Personally, I agree with both of them. I feel that it would be irresponsible of Gaiman not to open up the story wider, as he'd have to do to fill in the hours that a show would require. His book is dense, but it's still only one book. I also agree with HBO, who would probably be looking at this from a Game of Thrones perspective, and that strict adherence to the book at least in the early days of the series would gather a larger audience, and original elements could be introduced over time. It's Gaiman's story, and he can do what he likes. Me, I'd probably keep the opening the way it is, and introduce backstory slowly throughout the run of the show rather than dump it all at the front.

The series is still moving forward, with FremantleMedia buying the option, and Gaiman is on board as an executive producers, as well as presumably still doing some writing duties. They'd be free to now shop the series to other possible outlets, such as Netflix, who rarely turn down an opportunity to kick HBO in the kidneys. Additionally, the semi-but-not-really-sequel, Anansi Boys, is being adapted for the BBC by Red Productions, who previous produced Bedlam, Blood and Queer as Folk. So that's exciting.

Via Den of Geek and  /Film.
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About MR. Clark

Adopting the descriptor of "successfully unpublished author", MR. Clark began writing things on the internet in 2012, which he believed to be an entirely reputable and civilized place to find and deliver information. He regrets much.

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